Throwback Thursday: Leave Me Alone, I’m Reading

This was pretty typical of me at a certain age (by which I mean all the ages including now…). I believe that is a Sweet Valley High book I was reading. We’re at a Christmas party, and my mom and stepdad are engrossed in an actual conversation which I was trying very hard to ignore.

In all seriousness, this was a Christmas party I loved to go to as a kid, at the house of one of my mom’s former teachers from Gardena High School, Richard Cody. We used to attend annually, driving from our home in the Inland Empire to their house in Santa Ana. In my role as endless, annoying fountain of Christmas spirit from July onwards, I was dazzled by something as simple as the taillights of the traffic on the 91 freeway, festive ribbons of red and white that were probably making my parents cuss under their breath.

Richard Cody and his wife had a huge network of extended family and friends, former students, children biological, foster, and adopted, and so on and so forth. We’d enjoy Christmas carols around the piano (often with me or my mom playing), orange sherbet punch, and a reading of The Night Before Christmas that culminated in Santa coming down the stairs and handing presents out to all the kids. When I was little, Santa was this really tall man named Benjamin, and then his son Malik inherited the post–that might be him on the left in the picture, or possibly his brother Ibi. (Clearly nobody was alarmed by Santa suddenly changing from white to black in the space of a year.)

That diverse cacophony of names, though: Malik, Ibi. Their mom Twyla. Erlene, Richard’s wife. Ted and Ariana, their biological kids. Moises, Marcos. Plenty of others I don’t remember. It was a music, just as much as the notes from the piano; a very SoCal music. The Codys’ expansive and generous social circle taught me a lot about the diversity of where I lived.

This would probably be a good December post, but in keeping with my childhood singing of Christmas carols at any given time of year, I’m posting it now.

Source: Finding Wonderland

May Flicktion Tuesday Challenge

Okay, I missed April. OOPS. But I’m back on track now, and it’s time for another 2sday Challenge, hosted over on the writing blog and posted by my co-blogger and fellow author Tanita S. Davis. Anyone is welcome to participate–just write your thing, inspired by the posted Flickr photo, and share a link on the original post if you want to. This month’s image comes from Flickr user Stefano Arteconi of Bologna, Italy:

Untitled

I came up with a poem this time, rather than a prose piece. I guess my brain is all tied up in my novel rewrite and needed a change! Anyway, here goes:

Ma Semblable – Ma Soeur


Hypocrite lecteuse!

Like me and unlike me
An evil twin
In a different hat.

Warped reflections,
Spot the difference—
Games we play
With ourselves

To minimize the fear
Of facing our double.
Who is who?
Which half is witch?

If you open your eyes
You will recognize me
I am the one
Carrying the baggage.

SAVE THE DATE: KidLitCon 2019 in Providence, RI

It’s hard to believe, but I don’t think we’ve posted about this yet–the next Kidlitosphere Conference is already well into the planning stages, spearheaded by our own Charlotte Taylor of Charlotte’s Library and Mia Wenjen of Pragmatic Mom. It’ll be in Providence, RI on March 22-23, 2019, and it’s got its own nifty website!

The latest awesome news about the conference is that Charlotte applied for and GOT a sizeable grant from the Providence Tourism Council, which means we can stretch our small budget and make the conference an even more memorable experience for everyone. This next con promises to be bigger and better than ever, too, with Charlotte and Mia at the helm. Reaching Readers is the theme, and there’s already an incredible list of attending bloggers and authors who have plans to come.

If you’ve been to KidLitCon before, you’ll know that it offers a far more intimate and less formal opportunity for bloggers, authors, librarians, teachers, illustrators, and other devotees of kidlit to come together and discuss current and ongoing issues, as well as sharing our areas of knowledge and expertise for the benefit of the kids (and, let’s face it, adults) who read and enjoy books for young people. Speaking personally, it’s at KidLitCon that I “found my tribe,” so to speak–I’ve made lifelong friends with fellow book lovers who might be writers, readers, or both, but regardless of our actual job titles, we share that same passion.

I’m planning to attend (although there’s a possibility I might be traveling elsewhere at the time, I’m hoping to make it all happen!) and look forward to meeting even more members of the tribe–so if you’re interested, go check out the programming notes and get involved in a panel!

Source: Finding Wonderland

Mental Health Awareness Month: A Review Roundup

Source: Mental Health America

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and we’ve reviewed a number of titles over the years that we thought were exceptional portrayals of the experience of mental illness and related difficulties. As we all know, reading a good book can make us feel less alone–and, honestly, sometimes that’s the one thing you need in order not to go over the edge. So here, in no particular order, is a by no means exhaustive list of recommended reads for Mental Health Month:

The Other Normals by Ned Vizzini

Try Not to Breathe by Jennifer R. Hubbard

100 Days of Cake by Shari Goldhagen

Dr. Bird’s Advice for Sad Poets by Evan Roskos

This is How I Find Her by Sara Polsky

Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley

Delicate Monsters by Stephanie Kuehn

Define “Normal” by Julie Anne Peters

First Day on Earth by Cecil Castellucci

Saving Francesca by Melina Marchetta

Scars by Cheryl Rainfield

Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson

Nice Girls Endure by Chris Struyk-Bonn

These Gentle Wounds by Helene Dunbar

Source: Finding Wonderland